Dr. Edward Everett Hale, Senate Chaplain

Edward Everett Hale

 “Do you pray for the Senators, Dr. Hale? someone asked the chaplain. No, I look at the Senators and pray for the country.”  

 

EDWARD EVERETT HALE, Senate chaplain. The celebrated anecdote is not so unambiguous as it appears. There is no reason to doubt the authenticity of Hales reply, but it should be understood within a framework of respect for the senators as well as concern for the country. He knew every one of them personally and regarded them, as he said in his preface to Prayers in The Senate , as intelligent men, in very close daily intimacy with each other, in the discharge of a common duty of the greatest importance.John R. Adams, Edward Everett Hale,

Ludwig van Beethoven Quotes

Portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820

  • Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy. 
  • Only the pure in heart can make a good soup. 
  • Nothing is more intolerable than to have to admit to yourself your own errors. 
  • Music is the mediator between the spiritual and the sensual life. 
  • What you are, you are by accident of birth; what I am, I am by myself. There are and will be a thousand princes; there is only one Beethoven. 
  • Music should strike fire from the heart of man, and bring tears form the eyes of woman. 
  • Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend. 
  • Recommend virtue to your children; it alone, not money, can make them happy. I speak from experience. 
  • Music is mediator between spiritual and sensual life. 
  • Anyone who tells a lie has not a pure heart, and cannot make a good soup. 
  • Recommend to your children virtue; that alone can make them happy, not gold. 
  • This is the mark of a really admirable man: steadfastness in the face of trouble. 
  • Music is the wine which inspires one to new generative processes, and I am Bacchus who presses out this glorious wine for mankind and makes them spiritually drunken. 
  • Friends applaud, the comedy is over. 
  • Beethoven can write music, thank God, but he can do nothing else on earth. 
  •  A great poet is the most precious jewel of a nation. 
  • Art! Who comprehends her? With whom can one consult concerning this great goddess? 
  • The barriers are not erected which can say to aspiring talents and industry, “Thus far and no farther.” 
  • Tones sound, and roar and storm about me until I have set them down in notes. 
  • Off with you! You’re a happy fellow, for you’ll give happiness and joy to many other people. There is nothing better or greater than that! 

Vincent van Gogh – Self Portrait with Grey Felt Hat

Self-Portrait with Grey Felt Hat, 1886-88
Vincent van Gogh
Rijksmuseum

It is better to be high-spirited even though one makes more mistakes, than to be narrow-minded and all too prudent.
– Vincent van Gogh

Aristotle Quotes.

A flatterer is a friend who is your inferior, or pretends to be so.

A friend is a second self.

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.

All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.

All virtue is summed up in dealing justly.

Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in the consciousness that we deserve them.

Education is the best provision for the journey to old age.

Happiness depends upon ourselves.

How many a dispute could have been deflated into a single paragraph if the disputants had dared to define their terms.

Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

If some animals are good at hunting and others are suitable for hunting, then the Gods must clearly smile on hunting.

It is in justice that the ordering of society is centered.

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims.

Law is mind without reason.

Man perfected by society is the best of all animals; he is the most terrible of all when he lives without law, and without justice.

Men acquire a particular quality by constantly acting a particular way… you become just by performing just actions, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave actions.

One swallow does not make a summer, neither does one fine day; similarly one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy.

Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.

Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime.

The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.

The gods too are fond of a joke.

The moral virtues, then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.

The only stable state is the one in which all men are equal before the law.

To give a satisfactory decision as to the truth it is necessary to be rather an arbitrator than a party to the dispute.

To perceive is to suffer.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.

Young people are in a condition like permanent intoxication, because youth is sweet and they are growing.

It is not always the same thing to be a good man and a good citizen.

Evil brings men together.

Plato Quotes

Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history.

PLATO, Ion

The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future life.

PLATO, The Republic

The beginning is the most important part of the work.

PLATO, The Republic

The more the pleasures of the body fade away, the greater to me is the pleasure and charm of conversation.

PLATO, The Republic

Democracy is a charming form of government, full of variety and disorder, and dispensing a sort of equality to equals and unequal alike.

PLATO, The Republic

Many men are loved by their enemies, and hated by their friends, and are the friends of their enemies, and the enemies of their friends.

PLATO, Lysis

If a man can be properly said to love something, it must be clear that he feels affection for it as a whole, and does not love part of it to the exclusion of the rest.

PLATO, The Republic

Was not this … what we spoke of as the great advantage of wisdom — to know what is known and what is unknown to us?

PLATO, Charmides

Until philosophers are kings, or the kings and princes of this world have the spirit and power of philosophy, and political greatness and wisdom meet in one, and those commoner natures who pursue either to the exclusion of the other are compelled to stand aside, cities will never have rest from their evils — no, nor the human race, as I believe — and then only will this our State have a possibility of life and behold the light of day.

PLATO, The Republic

In things which we know, everyone will trust us … and we may do as we please, and no one will like to interfere with us; and we are free, and masters of others; and these things will be really ours, for we shall turn them to our good.

PLATO, Lysis

The eyes … are the windows of the soul.

PLATO, Phaedrus

No evil can happen to a good man, neither in life nor after death.

PLATO, The Apology

For all good and evil, whether in the body or in human nature, originates … in the soul, and overflows from thence, as from the head into the eyes.

PLATO, Charmides

That’s what education should be … the art of orientation. Educators should devise the simplest and most effective methods of turning minds around. It shouldn’t be the art of implanting sight in the organ, but should proceed on the understanding that the organ already has the capacity, but is improperly aligned and isn’t facing the right way.

PLATO, The Republic

Everything desires not like but unlike: for example, the dry desires the moist, the cold the hot, the bitter the sweet, the sharp the blunt, the void the full, the full the void, and so of all other things; for the opposite is the food of the opposite, whereas like receives like receives nothing from like.

PLATO, Lysis

There is in every one of us, even those who seem to be most moderate, a type of desire that is terrible, wild, and lawless.

PLATO, The Republic

God is not the author of all things, but of good only.

PLATO, The Republic

Now in this island of Atlantis there was a great and wonderful empire which had rule over the whole island and several others, and over parts of the continent and, furthermore, the men of Atlantis had subjected the parts of Libya within the columns of Heracles as far as Egypt, and of Europe as far as Tyrrhenia.This vast power, gathered into one, endeavored to subdue at a blow our country and yours and the whole of the region within the straits, and then, Solon, your country shone forth, in the excellence of her virtue and strength, among all mankind.

PLATO, Timaeus

If you are wise, all men will be your friends and kindred, for you will be useful.

PLATO, Lysis

All knowledge, when separated from justice and virtue, is seen to be cunning and not wisdom.

PLATO, Menexenus

When the tyrant has disposed of foreign enemies by conquest or treaty, and there is nothing to fear from them, then he is always stirring up some war or other, in order that the people may require a leader.

PLATO, The Republic

For this … is the great error of our day in the treatment of the human body, that physicians separate the soul from the body.

PLATO, Charmides

Friends have all things in common.

PLATO, Phaedrus

The good are like one another, and friends to one another; and … the bad, as is often said of them, are never at unity with one another or with themselves, but are passionate and restless: and that which is at variance and enmity with itself is not likely to be in union or harmony with any other thing.

PLATO, Lysis

False words are not only evil in themselves, but they infect the soul with evil.

PLATO, Phaedo

There is great reason to hope that death is good; for one of two things — either death is a state of nothingness and utter unconsciousness, or, as men say, there is a change and migration of the soul from this world to another. Now if you suppose that there is no consciousness, but a sleep like the sleep of him who is undisturbed by the sight of dreams, death will be an unspeakable gain. For if a person were to select the night in which his sleep was undisturbed even by dreams, and were to compare with this the other days and nights of his life, and then were to tell us how many days and nights he had passed in the course of his life better and more pleasantly than this one, I think that any man … even the great king will not find many such days or nights, when compared with the others. Now if death is like this, I say that to die is gain; for eternity is then only a single night. But if death is the journey to another place, and there, as men say, all the dead are, what good, O my friends and judges, can be greater than this?

PLATO, The Apology

Musical training is a more potent instrument than any other, because rhythm and harmony find their way into the inward places of the soul.

PLATO, The Republic

The man who finds that in the course of his life he has done a lot of wrong often wakes up at night in terror, like a child with a nightmare, and his life is full of foreboding: but the man who is conscious of no wrongdoing is filled with cheerfulness and hope.

PLATO, The Republic

The people have always some champion whom they set over them and nurse into greatness…. This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears he is a protector.

PLATO, The Republic

You cannot conceive the many without the one.

PLATO, Parmenides

Tools which would teach men their own use would be beyond price.

PLATO, The Republic

Must not all things at the last be swallowed up in death?

PLATO, Phaedo

20120921-063114.jpg

Why Machiavelli?

Why Machiavelli? That question might naturally and legitimately occur to anyone encountering an entry about him in an encyclopedia of philosophy. Certainly, Machiavelli contributed to a large number of important discourses in Western thought—political theory most notably, but also history and historiography, Italian literature, the principles of warfare, and diplomacy. But Machiavelli never seems to have considered himself a philosopher—indeed, he often overtly rejected philosophical inquiry as beside the point—nor do his credentials suggest that he fits comfortably into standard models of academic philosophy. His writings are maddeningly and notoriously unsystematic, inconsistent and sometimes self-contradictory. He tends to appeal to experience and example in the place of rigorous logical analysis. Yet succeeding thinkers who more easily qualify as philosophers of the first rank did (and do) feel compelled to engage with his ideas, either to dispute them or to incorporate his insights into their own teachings. Machiavelli may have grazed at the fringes of philosophy, but the impact of his musings has been widespread and lasting. The terms “Machiavellian” or “Machiavellism” find regular purchase among philosophers concerned with a range of ethical, political, and psychological phenomena, even if Machiavelli did not invent “Machiavellism” and may not even have been a “Machiavellian” in the sense often ascribed to him. Moreover, in Machiavelli’s critique of “grand” philosophical schemes, we find a challenge to the enterprise of philosophy that commands attention and demands consideration and response. Thus, Machiavelli deserves a place at the table in any comprehensive survey of philosophy.I

20120920-201115.jpg